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Patient Stories

Because plasma can't be synthetically created.

Plasma is a vital source material for a number of plasma-derived medications that treat and prevent life-threatening diseases, illnesses and conditions. Plasma can't be created in a laboratory or synthetically produced. Compassionate donors donating their plasma make these medications possible.

Patients around the world need and value donors like you. You provide hope and give others a chance for better, more productive and healthier lives.

Because plasma donation saves lives.

Plasma-derived medicines are used globally for the treatment or prevention of serious diseases and conditions in multiple therapeutic areas:

  • Pulmonology
  • Hematology
  • Immunology
  • Neurology
  • Infectious disease
  • Shock and trauma

Your plasma donation helps save and improve the quality of life for thousands of people.


Because it's rewarding.

We appreciate our donors' time and the effort it takes to donate, so we compensate you for your time and effort. Rates vary, but on average you can earn up to $200 a month donating the plasma used to help make life-changing medicines.

More importantly, your plasma donations give real people a chance for a better quality of life that may not be possible without the plasma-derived medicines your donations help produce.

See the incredible impact your plasma donations can have on those who need plasma-derived medicines. See their stories, and learn how these medicines have impacted their lives.

When you donate plasma, you become a hero to countless individuals around the world.


SPECIALTY PLASMA PROGRAMS

Many of our locations look for donors who are able to donate plasma that contains specific antibodies. These specialty plasma programs are similar to source plasma donation; you may donate two times in any seven-day period (with at least 48 hours in between donations), and you are compensated for your time when you donate.

Check with your plasma donation center to see if they participate in these specialty plasma collection programs.

Anti-Hepatitis B Program

Have you had the three-shot series of Hepatitis B vaccine? This special program collects plasma from donors who have been vaccinated for hepatitis B and have formed hepatitis B antibodies. These antibodies are not naturally occurring. Successful donors have been immunized against hepatitis B. We are looking for individuals with high hepatitis B titers (the amount of hepatitis B antibodies found in the blood). The more recent your last hepatitis B vaccination, the more likely it is that your titers are high.

Anti-D Program

Are you Rh Negative? This special program collects plasma from donors with the Rho D antibody and uses it to make Rho(D) Immune Globulin, an injection given to Rh-negative mothers during pregnancy, and immediately after, in order to prevent thousands of infant deaths each year due to Rh incompatibility. If your plasma contains this antibody, you can help save babies' lives with each plasma donation.

Anti-Tetanus Program

Have you recently had a tetanus shot? This special program collects plasma from donors who have been vaccinated for tetanus and have formed tetanus antibodies. These antibodies are not naturally occurring. This special plasma is used to make tetanus immune globulin for use in the prophylaxis and treatment of tetanus bacterium. This disease, also known as lockjaw, affects hundreds of individuals yearly. If you have received a tetanus vaccine recently or have not received a tetanus vaccine in 10 years, you are an excellent candidate for this program.

Anti- Rabies Program

Have you recently had a rabies shot? This program collects plasma from donors who have been vaccinated for against rabies. Donors in this program have plasma high in these antibodies which can be used to produce life-saving rabies immune globulin products. Rabies is a disease that affects the central nervous system and is transmitted by coming into contact with the saliva of an infected animal. Rabies can be contracted if you are bitten, scratched, or come into contact with infected saliva from a rabid animal.